"nanna Nap" For Many After Christmas Lunch

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22nd December 2009, 01:51pm - Views: 697
"Nanna Nap" for Many After Christmas Lunch

* Over 45% of men to nap after lunch, compared to 39% of women
* A roast for most this Christmas

Men are more likely than women to take a little cat nap after the traditional Christmas lunch, the Australian National Retailers Association and American Express Annual Christmas survey had revealed.

Over 45 per cent of men will take a nap after lunch, compared to 39 per cent of women. Australians aged between 25 to 34 year olds are most likely to slip away for a bit of shut eye (51 per cent), while two thirds of 45-54 year olds (66 per cent) won't.

"Christmas day is probably the one day of the year, when we generally eat too much, and if you're not having a friendly game of cricket, or cleaning up after the feast, chances are you're having a cat nap," ANRA CEO Margy Osmond said.

Spending on Christmas food continues to be strong, with 76 per cent spending the same or more compared to last year and 24 per cent spending less. Most Australians will spend $100 on the main meal of the day (30 per cent).

The full roast remains the most popular meal at Christmas (38 per cent); however it is dropping in popularity, down from 42 per cent in 2007. People are increasingly turning to the seafood feast with 18 per cent opting for fish and prawns and the like, compared to 12 per cent in 2007.

Turkey is the number one choice among roast-goers at 44 per cent, followed by pork (21 per cent), lamb (16 per cent), chicken (14 per cent) and beef (five per cent).

Australians will still spend Christmas with their family with 93 per cent either at home or at a family member's home.

-ends-

NB. The survey results from the last three years are attached below. This is a survey of 1000 Australians aged 18 and over.

Media inquiries:
Liz Rodway
0417 817 970


SOURCE: Australian National Retailers Association


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